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Texas: Aerobatic planes at Thunder Over Dalhart

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There are always too many photos to put in one post about an airshow, so this post focuses on the aerobatic planes.

The opening performance

Most recent airshows we’ve attended have an opening performance with parachutists and flags to go along with the national anthem. This airshow was no different.  🙂

Though the planes didn’t come close enough for super sharp long distance photos, that was okay. The parachutists are the focus, anyway.

Parachutists just out of the airplanes.
Once the parachutists had joined up and unfurled the flag.
Another parachutist joined the act around the time that the red smoke was showing up in the sky.
Trying to capture the American flag waving, but it was upside down at this point.
The two parachutists have separated and the one with the flag is coming in for a landing.
A successful landing on the ground, flag on the ground behind him.

As you can see, the skies were overcast. It didn’t get any better during the rest of the performances.

The aerobatic planes

We saw performances by Mike (Spanky) Gallaway and David Martin Aerobatics. Gallaway also was the airshow announcer after his performance.

Mike Gallaway in the air.

I was still fussing with my settings when Mike Gallaway was in the air, so there are a lot more of the David Martin Aerobatics performance. The trick with David Martin’s plane is that technically it is not meant for aerobatics – it is a utility plane. So some of the stunts are truly spectacular for plane that isn’t designed for stunts.

Found a lighter patch of sky for a better view of the plane.
Here is the plane going sideways with smoke trails.

One of the coolest moments was watching this plane gliding into a landing with no propellers.

The slight movement on the propellers was from the wind, not from shutting off the engine. At this point, the propellers had been off for almost 30 seconds.

In the next post, I’ll share photos of the A-10 Thunderbolt 2 and the P-51 Mustang.

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